The Risk Of Failing To Maintain Your Car

As a vehicle owner it is vitally important that you are carrying out regular maintenance on your vehicle. In Pune, there are many car mechanics that helps to maintain your car by offering all kind of services in their car workshop.

Without proper maintenance, your vehicle will be a lot more likely to be prone to more serious problems in the future that could lead to you lose your life also being greatly out of pocket.

It has been noticed that some of the most expensive issues that can occur as a result of not maintaining your vehicle can be found below:-

# Fixing or replacing the cylinder – the need to either fix or replace the cylinder in your vehicle is often a sign of continued neglect. Cylinder failure occurs when the correct mixture of fuel, air and sparks are missing, which leads to the cylinder overheating and then failing.

# Replacing the transmission assembly – transmission problems can be caused by regular maintenance. These problems are rare only if regular maintenance, especially if you follow your manufacturer’s guide, is carried out. Without a fully functioning transmission, your car will be unable to turn and to replacement of the transmission assembly will be required.

# Replacing the cylinder head and spark plugs – not maintaining your cylinder head and spark plugs can lead to engine failure. Misfires in your engine will cause the cylinders to heat up and fail .

#Replacing the camshaft – failure to change your oil regularly and cleaning your valves will lead to dirt and grime building up which can result in your camshaft failing. This usually only happens if regular maintenance is neglected so you shouldn’t have a problem with this assembly unless you fail to maintain your vehicle.

If these problems occurs on road the consequence of it can be very expensive risking your life. So to avoid having to pay out your life and vast sums of money, it is important to ensure you carry out vehicle maintenance duties regularly.

You can book your service at any workshop at Pune online.

Bull Bars on Cars Banned in India- Here’s why

The government’s Ministry of Highways and Road Transport (MORTH) has banned bull-bars on cars and SUVs running on roads of India. The ministry has sent out a letter to the transport commissioners of all the states of the country, urging them to act against those vehicles running bull-bars.

letter-bull-bar-banned

Below are the reasons why Bull-bars are banned by Indian Government:

Bull-Bar is illegal:

bull-bars-banned

Motor Vehicle Act, Section 52 states that “No owner of a motor vehicle shall so alter the vehicle that the particulars contained in the certificate of registration are at variance with those originally specified by the manufacturer”.So fitting this accessory through the aftermarket is a crime and can lead to serious penalties.

Bull-Bars may interfere with airbags:

cars-with-airbags

During a crash event, the vehicle’s crash sensor(s) provide crucial information to the airbag electronic controller unit (ECU), including collision type, angle and severity of impact. Bull-bars can also interfere with the working of airbag sensors by upsetting the careful calculations that govern their working. This can cause airbags to deploy at the wrong time during a crash, or even not deploy at all. Both scenarios can be very dangerous to occupants of the vehicle.  This is a major reason why many automakers and insurance companies don’t approve bull-bars as accessories.

Dangerous for two-wheeler riders, pedestrians, cyclists:

cars-hitting-pedestrians

Bull-bars during a crash, hurt pedestrians, cyclists and two wheeler riders, and even cause death in certain cases.

Damages chasis of a car during big accidents:

cars-chasis

If your car met with a big accident, bull-bars not only impact the efficacy of airbags and crumple zones,but also cause the severe damage to both vehicle’s chasis.

 

If you have a car or SUV equipped with a bull-bar/bull-guard, visit the nearby workshop at http://www.mericar.com/amravati/ or call us on 0875-0000-555 to get it remove at the earlist.

Taking care of you and your car!

MeriCAR.com Amravati

 

How to Choose the Right Car Tires

mechanic

We show the difference between tire types, then steer you in the right direction

 

Buying car tires is easy. It’s finding the right ones for your car that can be difficult.

Get it wrong, and you can hobble your car’s performance and its ability to tackle any type of weather.

Since car tires usually need to be replaced every three or four years, here’s a refresher course on how to make sure you’re getting the right ones.

Most car tires fall into three main types: all-season, summer, and winter. Most people buy all-season tires because it’s easier and cheaper than buying one set for the winter and another for summer.

All-season car tires deliver a good, well-rounded performance but are never outstanding in any way. Summer tires deliver on handling and dry/wet braking, but they have dismal snow traction. By contrast, winter tires have outstanding snow traction but just fair braking ability on cleared roads.

Within each car tire category, there is a range of performance, as our tests routinely remind us. To see the basic differences in tire types, look at the chart below.

 

As you can see, no single tire type is outstanding in all conditions.

So how do you find the best tires for your car? Follow these three steps:

What Size Do You Need?

First, consult your owner’s manual or the placard on the driver’s side door jamb to find the recommended tire measurements. The label will look something like this: P215/60R16 94T.

The first part of the label—P215/60R16—refers to the tire’s various size measurements such as width and diameter. The 94 indicates the load index, which is how much weight each tire can support. Finally, the T is the speed rating, which is the tire’s maximum speed in relation to the load index.

You should match the tire’s size measurements, but you have some flexibility to go higher with the load index and speed rating.

What Type of Tire Do You Need?

Many retail websites will give you a listing of all tires available in your size. But in many cases, you’ll need to dig deeper to match the speed rating. The list below can help ID your tire type.

  • All-season tires come in S- and T-speed ratings. Known for good all-weather grip and long mileage, these are commonly fit to mainstream cars and SUVs.
  • Performance all-season tires come in H- and V-speed rating on many newer cars, especially those with enthusiast appeal or upgraded wheels. They tend to have better cornering grip than S- and T-speed rated all-season tires, but performance tires may not wear as long.
  • Ultra-high-performance all-season and summer tires typically come in ZR-, W-, and Y-speed ratings for sports cars and performance sedans. Differentiating between all-season and summer tires can be challenging and may require going to a manufacturer’s website to find out the details. One clue to tell them apart: A summer tire would not have an M&S (Mud & Snow) designation on the sidewall.
  • All-season and all-terrain truck tires naturally come in large sizes and are designed for the hauling and towing duties of light-duty pickups and SUVs. All-terrain tires generally have a more aggressive tread pattern to aid off-road traction. A tip is that many all-terrain tires will have “A/T” or “All Terrain” right in the model name.
  • Winter/snow tires are easily identified by a mountain and snowflake symbol displayed on the sidewall of the tire. Plus the tread looks busier than all-season tires with lots of slits, known as sipes. When shopping, be sure to buy winter tires in sets of four to optimize braking and handling.

What Are Your Priorities in Selecting a Tire?

Our research shows that people often choose a direct replacement tire when the car is still relatively new. But as the car ages, consumers become more inclined to switch to another model based on performance or price.

If you’re looking to make a switch, be sure to check our extensive tire ratings, especially if you’re seeking a model with maximum tread life and all-weather grip.

Happy Driving!

MERICARNASIK

How to Inspect Car Belts and Hoses

Check under the hood to prevent problems

A belt or hose failure can cause an overheated engine, loss of power steering, and loss of the electrical charging system. If a hose leaks coolant or the belt turning the water pump snaps, the cooling system is inoperable. If the engine overheats, it can suffer serious internal damage that requires expensive repairs and can ruin a summer vacation.

Overheating can occur anytime, but usually happens in the summer. Underhood temperatures are much higher, and heat can trigger or accelerate deterioration of rubber compounds.

Coolant and Heater Hoses

Hoses are the cooling system’s weakest structural component. They are made of flexible rubber compounds to absorb vibrations between the engine and radiator, or, in the case of heater hoses, the engine and body’s firewall. Designed to hold coolant under pressure, hoses are also subjected to fluctuating extremes of heat and cold, dirt, oils, and sludge. Atmospheric ozone also attacks rubber compounds.

The most damaging cause of hose failure—electrochemical degradation (ECD)—isn’t easy to detect. According to engineers for the Gates Corporation, a parts maker, ECD attacks hoses from the inside, causing tiny cracks. Acids and contaminants in the coolant can then weaken the yarn material that reinforces the hose. Eventually, pinholes can develop or the weakened hose may rupture from heat, pressure, or constant flexing.

Some easy, basic maintenance can help prevent coolant hose failure:

  • Check the white coolant-recovery tank often to ensure proper fluid level. Marks on the tank indicate the proper level for when the engine is cold or hot. If the tank is low after repeated fillings, suspect a leak. Also check for white, light green, blue, or pink coolant tracks in the engine bay, which is residue left from leaking coolant.
  • When the engine is cool, squeeze the hoses with your thumb and forefinger near the clamps, where ECD most often occurs. Feel for soft or mushy spots. A good hose will have a firm yet pliant feel.
  • Inspect for cracks, nicks, bulges usually while hot), or a collapsed section in the hose and oil contamination, or fraying near the connection points.
  • Look for parallel cracks around bends (caused by ozone), a hardened glassy surface (heat damage), or abrasive damage (hose is rubbing).
  • Flush and replace the coolant according to the owner’s manual. Clean coolant is less likely to support ECD.
  • Never remove the radiator cap when the engine is hot, as the hot coolent will be under pressure. Also, be aware that an electric cooling fan can come on at any time.

The upper radiator hose fails more often than any other hose, followed by the water pump bypass hose (if your vehicle is so equipped), and the outlet heater hose from the engine to the heater core. Experts recommend, however, that all hoses be replaced at least every four years or when one fails. Always use replacement hoses designed to fight ECD. Trademarks will vary among hose manufacturers. (Gates uses “ECR” for Electro-Chemical Resistant). Look for a “Type EC” label on the hose or its packaging. That is a Society of Automotive Engineers standard signifying “electrochemical.” Most vehicles built after 1993 come with ECD-resistant hoses.


Accessory Belts

Many of the same elements that attack hoses also attack belts—heat, oil, ozone, and abrasion. Almost all cars and trucks built today have a single multi-grooved serpentine belt that drives the alternator, water pump, power-steering pump, and air-conditioning compressor. Older vehicles may have separate V-belts that drive the accessories. The Car Care Council says chances of a V-belt failure rise dramatically after four years or 36,000 miles, while the critical point for a serpentine belt is 50,000 miles. Any belt should be changed when it shows signs of excessive wear. But many new composite belts don’t show signs of wear until the failure occurs.

Here are tips for inspecting belts:

  • Look for cracks, fraying, or splits on the top cover.
  • Look for signs of glazing on the belt’s sides. Glazed or slick belts can slip, overheat or crack.
  • Twist a serpentine belt to look for separating layers, cracks, or missing chunks of the grooves on the underside.

Replacement belts should be identical in length, width, and number of grooves to the factory belt. Serpentine belts are usually kept tight with an automatic tensioner. Signs of a belt-tension problem include a high-pitched whine or chirping sound and vibration noises. Without proper tension, belts will slip and generate heat or fail to turn the accessories.

If in doubt, check with a qualified technician about any cooling problems, and always consult your owner’s manual for routine maintenance procedures.

Happy Driving!

MeriCarNasik

How to Check Your Car’s Engine Oil

A one-minute investment can keep your car healthy and running smoothly

Think of motor oil as the life’s blood of your car’s engine. Checking it on a regular basis is a key part of keeping your engine running well and getting the most miles out of it. The oil lubricates the engine’s internal moving parts, keeping them from wearing too quickly. It also helps keep the engine clean, by preventing dirt buildup, and helps keep it from overheating.

Checking the oil level is a quick, easy job that we recommend you do at every other gas fill-up. All you’ll need is a rag or paper towel, and your car’s owner’s manual if you have questions.

Engine Oil, Check!

First, check the owner’s manual and follow the automaker’s recommendations. Some newer cars have electronic oil monitors and don’t have traditional dipsticks for manual inspection.

If checking the oil yourself, make sure the car is parked on level ground and, with most cars, the engine is cold, so you don’t burn yourself on a hot engine part. (With some cars, the automaker recommends that the oil be checked after the engine has been warmed up.) With the engine off, open the car’s hood and find the dipstick. Pull the dipstick out from the engine and wipe any oil off from its end. Then insert the dipstick back into its tube and push it all the way back in.

Pull it back out, and this time look at both sides of the dipstick to see where the oil is on the end. Every dipstick has some way of indicating the proper oil level, whether it be two pinholes, the letters L and H (low and high), the words MIN and MAX, or simply an area of crosshatching. If the top of the oil “streak” is between the two marks or within the crosshatched area, the level is fine.

But if the oil is below the minimum mark, you need to add oil as described below.

Also, check the oil’s color. It should appear brown or black. But if it has a light, milky appearance, this could mean coolant is leaking into the engine. Look closely for any metal particles, too, as this could mean there is internal engine damage. If you see either of these conditions, get the car to a mechanic for further diagnosis. If you suspect a coolant leak, have the car towed.

If everything’s okay, wipe off the dipstick again and insert it back into its tube, making sure it’s fully seated. Close the hood and you’re done.

How to Add Oil

Use the grade of oil recommended in the owner’s manual. It will usually have a designation such as 0W-20 or 5W-30. You can buy it by the quart at any service station or auto-parts store, as well as in many supermarkets and discount retailers.

To add oil, remove the oil filler cap, usually located on top of the engine. Since over-filling with oil is bad for the engine, you should add oil a little at a time. Start by adding about half a quart. Using a funnel helps avoid spills. Wait a minute or so and check the dipstick again. If the level is still below or near the minimum mark, add the rest of the quart. Unless your engine is leaking or burning oil (or if you haven’t checked it in awhile) you will rarely need to add more than a quart. However, if a second quart is needed, add that in slowly as well, checking as you go.

Screw the oil filler cap back on securely, and you’re done

HAPPY DRIVING!

MeriCarNasik

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