How to Check Your Car’s Engine Oil

A one-minute investment can keep your car healthy and running smoothly

Think of motor oil as the life’s blood of your car’s engine. Checking it on a regular basis is a key part of keeping your engine running well and getting the most miles out of it. The oil lubricates the engine’s internal moving parts, keeping them from wearing too quickly. It also helps keep the engine clean, by preventing dirt buildup, and helps keep it from overheating.

Checking the oil level is a quick, easy job that we recommend you do at every other gas fill-up. All you’ll need is a rag or paper towel, and your car’s owner’s manual if you have questions.

Engine Oil, Check!

First, check the owner’s manual and follow the automaker’s recommendations. Some newer cars have electronic oil monitors and don’t have traditional dipsticks for manual inspection.

If checking the oil yourself, make sure the car is parked on level ground and, with most cars, the engine is cold, so you don’t burn yourself on a hot engine part. (With some cars, the automaker recommends that the oil be checked after the engine has been warmed up.) With the engine off, open the car’s hood and find the dipstick. Pull the dipstick out from the engine and wipe any oil off from its end. Then insert the dipstick back into its tube and push it all the way back in.

Pull it back out, and this time look at both sides of the dipstick to see where the oil is on the end. Every dipstick has some way of indicating the proper oil level, whether it be two pinholes, the letters L and H (low and high), the words MIN and MAX, or simply an area of crosshatching. If the top of the oil “streak” is between the two marks or within the crosshatched area, the level is fine.

But if the oil is below the minimum mark, you need to add oil as described below.

Also, check the oil’s color. It should appear brown or black. But if it has a light, milky appearance, this could mean coolant is leaking into the engine. Look closely for any metal particles, too, as this could mean there is internal engine damage. If you see either of these conditions, get the car to a mechanic for further diagnosis. If you suspect a coolant leak, have the car towed.

If everything’s okay, wipe off the dipstick again and insert it back into its tube, making sure it’s fully seated. Close the hood and you’re done.

How to Add Oil

Use the grade of oil recommended in the owner’s manual. It will usually have a designation such as 0W-20 or 5W-30. You can buy it by the quart at any service station or auto-parts store, as well as in many supermarkets and discount retailers.

To add oil, remove the oil filler cap, usually located on top of the engine. Since over-filling with oil is bad for the engine, you should add oil a little at a time. Start by adding about half a quart. Using a funnel helps avoid spills. Wait a minute or so and check the dipstick again. If the level is still below or near the minimum mark, add the rest of the quart. Unless your engine is leaking or burning oil (or if you haven’t checked it in awhile) you will rarely need to add more than a quart. However, if a second quart is needed, add that in slowly as well, checking as you go.

Screw the oil filler cap back on securely, and you’re done

HAPPY DRIVING!

MeriCarNasik

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Love your Car?

 LOVE YOUR CAR?

Simple tasks that can make your car last longer.

1) Check the Engine Oil
Do it regularly—monthly for a vehicle in good condition; more often if you notice an oil leak or find you need to add oil routinely. The car should be parked on level ground so you can get an accurate dipstick reading. Don’t overfill. And if you do have a leak, find and fix it soon.

2) Check Tire Air Pressure
Once a month and before any extended road trips, use an accurate tire-pressure gauge to check the inflation pressure in each tire, including the spare. Do this when the tires are cold (before the vehicle has been driven or after no more than a couple of miles of driving). Use the inflation pressure recommended by the vehicle’s manufacturer, not the maximum pressure embossed on the tire’s sidewall. The recommended pressure is usually found on a placard on a front doorjamb, in the glove compartment, or in the owner’s manual. Also be sure to inspect tires for abnormal or uneven wear, cuts, and any sidewall bulges you can see

3) Wash the Car
Try to wash the car every week, if you can. Wash the body and, if necessary, hose out the fender wells and undercarriage to remove dirt and road salt. It’s time to wax the finish when water beads become larger than a

quarter.

4) Other Checks at Each Oil Change
For normal driving, many automakers recommend changing the engine oil and filter every 7,500 miles or six months, whichever comes first. This is sufficient for the majority of motorists. For “severe” driving—with frequent, very cold starts and short trips, dusty conditions, or trailer towing—the change interval should be shortened to every 3,000 miles or three months. (Check your owner’s manual for the specific intervals recommended for your vehicle.) Special engines such as diesels and turbocharged engines may need more-frequent oil changes.

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HAPPY DRIVING!

MericarNasik 

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Going to change Car Engine oil??Read this first….

The engine oil used for summer is typically thicker. Thinner oil in the winter allows it to warm up quicker and lubricate sooner. Thicker oil will take longer to warm up and perform its duties. Your vehicle may only want one type of oil. Your owner’s manual will have more information.

Your vehicle will take 5 liters of a 5w30 motor oil. If you have been using fully synthetic oil, you will want to replace it with a fully synthetic oil. Some people insist on using a German oil company to keep it original. However, this is totally optional. You can use whatever brand of filter you would like. Each brand will have their own product code for that filter.

We recommend having a certified workshop, such as one from MeriCAR.com, which will help you perform an oil change if you are thinking about having your car serviced.

Happy Driving!

MeriCAR Amravati Team

http://www.mericar.com/amravati/

Avoid car maintenance can result in more costly problems

Cost of car maintenance and car servicing may be hard to consume, postponing regularly scheduled maintenance actually can result in more costly problems in the long run.

car maintenance

• Not changing the oil on time. Oil changes are part of the regularly scheduled car maintenance intervals. The manufacturer may recommend changing the oil at specific intervals, sometimes as high as every 10,000 miles, or when an oil monitoring sensor indicates the oil is dirty. So, the first step in being “on time” knows what is recommended for your vehicle.

• Don’t rotate your tyres? They will develop a negative wear pattern and wear out prematurely. Regular wheel alignment checks will keep the tyres rolling straight ahead. Steering and suspension parts wear over time; this causes the wheel alignment to go out. Leave it alone and the tyres wear out. Leave it longer and worn steering and suspension parts accelerate wear on each other and tyres.

• Every day people drive their cars until they hear grinding coming from the wheels when they stop. Then they have to spend time and money to repair the brakes. Whenever you go into the workshop for an oil change, have the brakes checked. This way you’ll find out you need brakes before they get so bad that it costs you hundreds.

• Tyres must be checked for proper inflation rates regularly. When tyres are allowed to run low, two things happen. Negative wear patterns develop and premature tyre failure can occur, all from a low air pressure. Keep those tyres blown up! Not only will they last longer, you’ll get better gas mileage too. Why? Because properly inflated tyres offer less rolling resistance, hence you don’t have to step harder on the gas to overcome the resistance from a low tyre.

• When you check the fluids regularly, you’ll notice when you have fluid loss, which might be due to a leak. This is a tipoff to check that system for a leak and repair it before it escalates to big bucks. Common fluids include engine coolant, transmission fluid, brake fluid, power steering fluid, differential fluid, transfer case lubricant.

• A failed sensor is a common reason for a “check engine” light to illuminate and also results in the engine misfiring. Ignoring this problem could cause the larger problem of the catalytic converter failing, which would result in the car not passing emissions.

Neglecting coolant, brake, transmission and other fluids. While oil is key to the proper operation of your engine, there are other fluids critical to keeping your car running well. The owner’s manual will have a list of recommendations for how often to service these components. Delays in service, or ignoring them altogether, could result in damage not just to the specific component but to the engine or other parts as well, resulting in a very high repair bill.

Source:http://www.carservicingpoint.co.uk/blog/top-car-maintenance-mistakes-to-avoid/

Save gas and go green

Does it seem like every time you go to fill up the price of gas has gone up again? Here are some ways to save money.

save gas

1. Maintain your vehicle: A well maintained vehicle uses less gas than a poorly maintained vehicle. Regular maintenance helps ensures you’re getting the best mileage your vehicle can provide.

2. Check your engine air filter every 3 months: A blocked air filter makes an engine work harder and costs you in miles per gallon. You can get replacement filters at workshop as well as many hardware and even department stores, and they’re easy to change.

3. Check your tyre pressure every month: Tyre pressure gauges are inexpensive and easy to use, so buy one and keep it in your car. Under-inflated tyres are harder to turn, so your engine needs to work more to go the same distance. Inflate your tyres to the proper.
4. Drive at the speed limit: Driving even 10 miles per hour over the limit will cost your gas. Experts estimate that driving at the speed limit will give most drivers 10% better gas mileage.

5. Don’t Idle: Leaving a car idling for more than 30 seconds burns more gas than turning off the engine and starting it again.
6. Do use your air conditioning: On the highway, a vehicle with the windows rolled up and the air conditioning turned on uses less gas than the same car with the windows down. Having the windows closed reduces drag on the car so it rolls easier and burns less gas.

Source: http://www.doityourself.com/stry/tune-up-your-car-and-save-gas#.UeEbLDtT6YU#ixzz2YupHHwt5